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Boris Johnson accused of delusion in final PMQs as he declares ‘mission largely accomplished’ – live | Politics

‘Mission largely accomplished,’ Johnson claimed as he ended the final PMQs to a standing ovation from the Tories.

Sir Edward Leigh (Con) said he wanted to thank Johnson for developing the vaccine, delivering Brexit, leveling off and supporting Ukraine. “For true courage and determination, carry on.”

Johnson Thanks Leigh.

And he says he has advice for his successor. Stay close to the Americans, stay close to the Ukrainians and stick to freedom, he says.

He says he likes the Treasury, but if the government had listened to them it would never have built the M25.

Don’t listen to Twitter, he advises.

He says he got the country through epidemics and helped save other countries from brutality.

“Mission largely accomplished… for now,” he says. “Hasta la vista, kid,” he finished.

This is a reference to Terminator 2.

And that’s it. Johnson received a standing ovation as he left the chamber.

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PMQs – Snap Judgment

Sir Lindsay Hoyle said when he was elected speaker that he would not allow PMQs to last 40 or 50 minutes, as his predecessor John Bercow did, but this afternoon Hoyle made an exception to mark Boris Johnson’s last day in the despatch box. By the end, after a long and often exhausting session that focused mostly on Johnson’s legacy, Whale must have been thinking it would have been better to pull the plug at 12.30 sharp. But then, in his final reply to Sir Edward Leigh, Johnson suddenly switched gears and said something funny.

It was the political equivalent of his last will and testament, and deserves to be reproduced in its entirety. He said:

I’d like to use the last few seconds to offer some words of advice to my successor, whoever he may be.

Number one: Stand by the Americans, stand by the Ukrainians, stand up for freedom and democracy everywhere. Cut taxes and deregulate wherever possible to make it a great place to live and invest.

I love the Treasury but remember that if we always listened to the Treasury we wouldn’t have built the M25 or the Channel Tunnel.

Focus on the road ahead but always remember to check the rear view mirror.

And remember, after all, it’s not Twitter that counts, they’re the ones who sent us here.

The last few years have been some of the greatest opportunities of my life, and it is true that I helped secure the biggest Tory majority for 40 years and a huge reshaping of UK politics. We have changed our politics and regained our national independence.

We helped, I helped, helped this country through an epidemic and saved another country from brutality. And, frankly, that’s enough going on. Mission largely accomplished – for now.

I want to thank you, Mr. Speaker, I want to thank all the wonderful staff in the House of Commons, I want to thank all my friends and colleagues, I want to thank my friend opposite, I want to thank everyone here, and Hasta La Vista, Thank you, baby.

Johnson showed little interest in introspection, and the speech he gave at the start of the confidence motion debate on the government on Monday afternoon was mostly a catalog of pomp and incredulity. This afternoon’s speech was all the more revealing, for three reasons.

First, it’s a useful guide to what Johnson’s political convictions really are: Atlanticism, low taxes, and deregulation—conventional conservatism, in other words, leavened in support of the kind of big spending projects the Treasury dislikes. Leveling didn’t get a mention, nor did the environment. But his advice to politicians (focus on the future and don’t take Twitter too seriously) was sound.

Second, although Johnson never publicly admitted that he was the cause of his own downfall, there was an indication that his achievements were limited. Listening to his speech on Monday, you would assume that his government has been the most successful ever. But here he boils it down: a big election victory, Brexit, getting through Covid and Ukraine. “It’s enough to go on,” he added, suggesting that much was left undone.

And that leads to the third and most interesting feature of his departure – the very strong hint that he intends to make a comeback. “Mission largely accomplished – for now,” she said. And he concluded with a line from Terminator 2 that would normally be “See you later.” Another famous line from the same film is “I’ll be back.”

Tory applause for Johnson at the end seemed quite genuine, according to colleagues watching from the gallery. But that may just be a function of good behavior, as much as anything else, and doesn’t necessarily mean they want him to stay. Keir Starmer has done a good job of explaining what a mess Johnson got his party into, and there is no evidence that voters will welcome a second Johnson premiership. Britain has not seen an outgoing prime minister return to Downing Street since Harold Wilson in 1974 after nearly 50 years out of office. But, like his quasi-US nemesis Donald Trump, Johnson is clearly mulling the possibility of a return one day. . This may not be the last PMQs after all.

Jessica Elgott

Jessica Elgott

Supporters of Liz Truss and Penny Mordant were locked in a last-minute battle for votes before the final parliamentary ballots opened this morning.

Two MPs supporting Rishi Sunak told the Guardian they expected to face Liz Truss on the final ballot for party members. “I think he’s the one with the momentum,” said one.

Another Sunak supporter said they thought the polls were seeing “significant churn” but added they would be mistaken for polling campaigns. “It’s all very unpredictable, I don’t think trying to stitch it up in any way is necessarily going to help particularly,”

Sunak’s supporters said they hoped to see a new wave of votes for their candidate over the weekend to give him momentum. One MP said Sunock was a significantly better media performer than Truss, which they expected would give him the edge in the coming days. “We should see his face everywhere as the ballots start coming out.”

Mordaunt MPs in the camp insisted to colleagues that they believed Mordaunt v Sunac would be a “cleaner campaign” as opposed to Sunac v Truss, which one said would be entirely “blue on blue” – referring to the attacks they had directed against each other. TV Debate.

MPs gave colleagues screenshots showing Mordant’s electoral advantage. “I think we’re still seeing a swing away from Liege this morning,” said one of Mordant’s campaign team.

‘Mission largely accomplished,’ Johnson claimed as he ended the final PMQs to a standing ovation from the Tories.

Sir Edward Leigh (Con) said he wanted to thank Johnson for developing the vaccine, delivering Brexit, leveling off and supporting Ukraine. “For true courage and determination, carry on.”

Johnson Thanks Leigh.

And he says he has advice for his successor. Stay close to the Americans, stay close to the Ukrainians and stick to freedom, he says.

He says he likes the Treasury, but if the government had listened to them it would never have built the M25.

Don’t listen to Twitter, he advises.

He says he got the country through epidemics and helped save other countries from brutality.

“Mission largely accomplished… for now,” he says. “Hasta la vista, kid,” he finished.

This is a reference to Terminator 2.

And that’s it. Johnson received a standing ovation as he left the chamber.

Gerain Davis (Lab) said the Prime Minister will be remembered as a man of his word. “Raise them high” – 200,000 people have died from Covid, he says. And he says those who took out student loans now have to pay 7%…

Tory MPs are joking. Sir Lindsay Hoyle, The speaker intervened to calm them down.

Will the Prime Minister help the helpless people? Davis said

Johnson Said students want a system where they don’t pay back more than they borrow. And the government will give people high-wage, high-skill jobs, he says. He said Labor would allow them to be diluted to their advantage.

Anna Firth (Con) said the Prime Minister would back plans for a new hospital in Southend.

Johnson He said that the case is being reviewed.

John Nicholson (SNP) asked how many people would be included in Johnson’s resignation honors list.

Johnson Nicholson said that would have to wait.

Martin Vickers (Con) asked about the tariff on whitefish and its impact on the seafood industry in his constituency.

Johnson Says he wants to encourage the fish and chip industry not to use Russian fish.

Kirsten Oswald (SNP) says Brexit has been imposed against Scotland’s will. Does the Prime Minister recognize that Scotland is a democracy? He has no right to stop the referendum he voted for.

Johnson Says SNP overtaxing to the tune of £900m. A referendum was held in 2014, he says.

Ronnie Cowan (SNP) questioned why Scotland would not have the opportunity to seek prosperity through independence.

Johnson Says the people of Scotland are backed by the huge financial firepower of the UK Treasury.

Marc Francois (Con) Johnson thanks Northern Ireland legacy bill, says it means veterans no longer fear prosecution.

Johnson Thanks to Francois for his campaign.

John McNally (SNP) asks whether Johnson respects the people of Scotland’s right to self-determination.

Johnson Says he thinks there are more pressing issues for the people of Scotland.

Crispin Blunt (Con) recalled the deadlock in Parliament over Brexit in 2019. Does the Prime Minister understand why he expressed gratitude to those people who could find the wood for the tree?

Johnson Thank him for that.

Claire Hanna (SDLP) says the government has broken faith in the Good Friday Agreement. Anglo-Irish relations have also suffered, he says. Does the Prime Minister have any regrets about his legacy?

Johnson Said he completely disagrees.

Kate Osamu (Lab) said only one in four applicants received compensation from the Windrush compensation scheme. Shouldn’t the scheme be taken out of Home Office control?

Johnson Said the compensation has increased. And Labor has never apologized for the role it played in the scandal, he says.

Andrew Bowie (Con) Thanks to Johnson for his commitment to Scotland. Does the Prime Minister agree that the UK will always be stronger together?

Johnson Said he couldn’t have kept it better himself.

Johnson Says taking a disposable barbecue to dry grass is “obviously crazy”.

Tony Lloyd (Lab) said that people in the North don’t think leveling has achieved anything.

Johnson He disagreed, citing the Northern Railway Plan.

Jake Berry (Con) asked Johnson to urge his successors to maintain the leveling agenda.

Johnson Agreed he says leveling is about equality of opportunity.




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